You Snooze You Sometimes Lose: Court Enforces 6 Month Statute of Limitations with Respect to Section 1981 Claim But Not with Respect to Title VII Claim

Did you know that an agreement shortening the time within which to bring an employment law claim may be enforceable?  Indeed, in Order of United Commercial Travelers of Am. v. Wolfe, 331 U.S. 586, 608, 67 S. Ct. 1355, 91 L. Ed. 1687 (1947), the Supreme Court stated with respect to contracts generally that “in the absence of a controlling statute to the contrary, a provision in a contract may validly limit, between the parties, the time for bringing an action … to a period less than that prescribed in the general statute of limitations, [if] the shorter period [is] a reasonable period.”  This principle has been applied and enforced in the employment law context.

For example, recently in Njang v. Whitestone Grp., Inc., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 65370, 129 Fair Empl. Prac. Cas. (BNA) 362 (D.D.C. May 18, 2016), plaintiff filed an action alleging race discrimination in violation of both Section 1981 and Title VII.  In its motion for summary judgment, the former employer argued that plaintiff’s claims — which were filed more than two years after the termination — were time barred because the employment contract required the employee “to file all claims or lawsuits in any way relating to employment with the Company no more than six months after the date of the employment action that is the subject of the claim or lawsuit.”  Id. at *5.

The court held that the shorter limitation period was enforceable with respect to the Section 1981 claim but not with respect to the Title VII claim.  With respect to the Section 1981 claim, the court relied on precedent in finding that “six months is a reasonable period of time . . . both because nothing within Section 1981 indicates that Congress intended for a longer window to bring such a claim, and also because the statute lacks other features that would make filing a claim within six months impracticable, such as an administrative exhaustion requirement.”  Id. at *15.

By contrast, the court held that Title VII’s time-consuming administrative requirements, including (i) plaintiff’s need to first file a charge with the EEOC within 180 days after the alleged unlawful conduct, (ii) the EEOC’s investigation of the charge, and (iii) the EEOC’s issuance of a right to sue letter, make a 6-month limitation period unreasonable.  Id. at **18-19.  As the court in Njang explained, “merely by complying with the administrative exhaustion requirements of Title VII, plaintiffs are typically precluded from bringing their claims in court within six months of the challenged conduct, which means that a six-month limitations period has the practical effect of waiving employees’ substantive rights under Title VII.”  Id. at *20.

As a practical matter, employers should consider implementing a clause in their employment contracts and employee handbooks reducing the statute of limitations to a shorter, yet still “reasonable” time.  While 6 months might be too short a period – particularly given the administrative requirements of Title VII – a 1-year period might very well pass muster as a reasonable period of time.

Diversity & Inclusion Institute conference to feature Second City

A branch of the comedy empire that helped shape American theater for nearly 50 years will use the power of improv to demonstrate the benefits of greater workplace diversity and inclusion during the commercial insurance industry’s Diversity & Inclusion Institute Conference in Chicago this September.

Second City Works, the B2B side of The Second City, the world’s leading comedy theater and school of improvisation, will showcase its groundbreaking Diversity & Inclusion programming at an interactive workshop featuring comedic scenes to educate and inform about diversity, and bring to life the practice of improv to build skills for more inclusive teams.

The Second City Works performance on Wednesday, Sept. 28, is being held in conjunction with Lloyd’s of London’s Dive In–the Festival for Diversity and Inclusion in Insurance, and will be free and open to commercial insurance industry employees throughout the Chicago area.

The paid portion of the two-day conference, which continues on Thursday, Sept. 29, will feature Howard Ross, founder and chief learning officer of Cook Ross Inc., on “Managing in a Time of Fear.” Mr. Ross, an internationally known diversity training expert and author, will help insurance industry executives develop a clear sense of how events of the past few years—including the recent police shootings, homophobia and concerns about immigration–are influencing their employees. They also will learn about the science behind fear so that they can adopt effective intervention strategies.

Eric Alva, the first American soldier wounded during Operation Iraqi Freedom, will address his battle to overcome his injuries and the difficulties he encountered after leaving the military and coming out as gay. From learning to walk with a prosthetic, to his desire to continue his education and obtain his degree, Mr. Alva inspires audiences to persevere by demonstrating how he conquered such obstacles.

Also during the conference, a panel of insurance industry CEOs will discuss the business case for greater diversity and inclusion, publicly pledging to support efforts to foster greater diversity both within their organizations and throughout the industry.

Other sessions will include:

  • D+I considerations in client engagement
  • Insurance regulator focus on driving diversity in the industry
  • Demonstrations of technology designed to facilitate diversity and inclusion.
  • The impact of “covering” at work on employee productivity
  • The latest D&I research conducted by the Institute and in conjunction with the Families & Work Institute
  • Executive Insights – short, inspirational speeches by industry leaders from Ryan Specialty Group, The Hartford, Willis Towers Watson and Zurich

To review the complete agenda and to register for the Absolute Inclusion Conference, visit http://conferences.businessinsurance.com/conference/diversity-inclusion-institute/2016/agenda.

The Absolute Inclusion Leadership Conference is the inaugural event of Business Insurance’s Diversity & Inclusion Institute, which was launched last December to promote and advance diversity and inclusion throughout the commercial insurance industry. For more information about the Institute, visit www.diversityinclusioninstitute.com.